Job moves to No matching connector state in a conditional workflow

When a job in a workflow with conditional processing stops at a step and the value of the State column is No matching connector, the conditional processing might not be set up correctly. Ricoh ProcessDirector does not validate the conditional processing when it saves a workflow.
To fix a conditional workflow with a job that stops in a No matching connector state:
  1. Inspect each rule to make sure it does not have conditions that conflict with each other.
    For example, a rule has two conditions:
    • Customer name = A
    • Customer name = B
    The rule specifies that All of the conditions apply. No jobs are sent through the connector to the next step because no job has two customers. All jobs stay in the step in a No matching connector state. If the rule specified that any condition applies, jobs for customers A and B would be sent through the connector.
  2. Inspect all the connectors from a step to other steps. Make sure that the rules assigned to the connectors process all jobs that the step receives.
    For example, a step has two connectors:
    • Connector1 has a rule with one condition: Total pages < 20
    • Connector2 has a rule with one condition: Total pages > 20
    The rules do not tell Ricoh ProcessDirector how to process jobs with 20 pages. Those jobs stay in the step in a No matching connector state. If the first rule specified Total pages <= 20, jobs with 20 pages would be sent through Connector1.
  3. Make sure to account for jobs that do not have a property value when your conditional processing specifies values for the property.
    For example, a step has two connectors. Each connector has a rule with a condition that specifies a Job priority property value:
    • The condition for the first rule is Job priority > 1.
    • The condition for the second rule is Job priority = 1.
    When jobs that do not have a Job priority property value reach the step with these connectors, they stay in the step in a No matching connector state. To process those jobs, add this condition to a new rule or to one of the existing rules: Job priority unlike %.
  4. Inspect all conditional processing paths to make sure that the rules between different steps in the path do not conflict.
    For example, a conditional workflow branch has a connector in the Receive phase. The connector has a rule with one condition: Input data stream = PDF. Later in the same branch, a step in the Prepare phase has two connectors.
    • Connector1 has a rule with one condition: Input data stream = Postscript
    • Connector2 has a rule with one condition: Input data stream = Unknown
    All jobs that arrive at the step are PDF. They were sent through the connector whose rule specifies that the input data stream is PDF. Because neither connector processes PDF jobs, the jobs stay in the step in a No matching connector state. To fix this example, review how the workflow processes input data streams.
  5. To fix problems, disable the workflow and edit it.
    If jobs are in the workflow, make a copy of the workflow and edit the copy.
  6. Enable the workflow and test it.
    A conditional workflow might have multiple problems.

    • If you have a complex workflow, we recommend that you connect each step with branches to multiple steps to its own FailWithMessage step. Give each connector a rule with no condition. For each FailWithMessage step, set the Failure message property to a value that identifies the conditional processing. If a job arrives at a FailWithMessage step, Ricoh ProcessDirector writes the message to the job log. The message identifies the conditional processing problem.
  7. Use the Process Again action to switch jobs in No matching connector state to the new workflow.
 
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