Locating print files

Applications that submit jobs with JDF job tickets can either send the print files along with the job ticket, or leave the files in another location on the network. The job ticket is not required to list the print files that the job contains. However, if the job ticket does list the print files, it can use either relative path names or absolute path names.

Regardless of how Ricoh ProcessDirector finds the print files, it copies them into the location specified in the Folder location property of the hot folder input device (if they are not there already) and starts to process the job. Ricoh ProcessDirector does not automatically delete all the print files that are used in jobs that are submitted with JDF job tickets. It only deletes the files in the Folder location. It does not delete print files that are in subfolders of the Folder location or that are on other file systems. You must plan to delete the print files that are left in the those locations as part of your system maintenance.

Not listing print files in JDF

If the job ticket does not list the print files, Ricoh ProcessDirector expects to receive the job ticket and all the print files in the location specified in the Folder location property of the hot folder input device. If any of the files are missing, Ricoh ProcessDirector continues to wait for them.

In this case, you must use the List batching method and submit a list file with the job.

Listing files using relative path names

If the job ticket lists the print files using relative path names, Ricoh ProcessDirector expects to find all the print files in subfolders of the Folder location; they cannot be in parallel folders or on any other file systems. For example, if the job ticket includes the file path printfiles/test.pdf, the hot folder expects to find the file in: [folder location]/printfiles/test.pdf.

  • You can use these formats for a relative path name:
    dir/filename
    filename
  • These formats are supported but not recommended:
    file://dir/filename
    file://dir\filename
    dir\filename
    file://./dir/filename
    file://.\dir\filename
    ./dir/filename
    .\dir\filename
    In Ricoh ProcessDirector file:// is equivalent to file:///. Ricoh ProcessDirector does not permit a host name or an IP address after the second forward slash (/).

Listing files using absolute path names

If the job ticket lists the print files using absolute path names, the print files can be anywhere on your network that is accessible from the Ricoh ProcessDirector primary server. Ricoh ProcessDirector uses the absolute path statements in conjunction with a mapping file to find the print files. A mapping file is a file that matches the file paths in the job ticket to file paths on mounted file systems. The mapping file is stored on the primary server. Only one mapping file is needed for a primary server; it can list as many file paths as needed.

When Ricoh ProcessDirector looks for the print files listed in the job ticket with absolute paths, it looks in each location listed in the mapping file until it finds them. If it reaches the end of the mapping file without finding the print files, it looks for files received in the Folder location. If it still does not find the files, it waits and checks again at the next poll interval.

  • You can use these formats for an absolute path name:
    file://hostname/drive:/dir/filename
    Omit drive: for files on systems that do not use drive letters.
  • These formats are supported but not recommended:
    file:///drive:\dir\filename
    file://drive:/dir/filename
    file://drive:\dir\filename
    drive:\dir\filename
    drive:/dir/filename
    In Ricoh ProcessDirector file:// is equivalent to file:///. Ricoh ProcessDirector does not permit a host name or an IP address after the second forward slash (/).
  • These formats are not supported:
    file://IP_address/drive:/dir/filename
    file://localhost/drive:/dir/filename
    

  • You need a file system mapping file if the file paths include identical directory names but have different formats. For example, if the job ticket specifies file:\\\C:\myfiles\testfiles\test1.pdf and the actual file path is /myfiles/testfiles/test1.pdf, you must create a file system mapping file to convert the file path from Windows to Linux or AIX format.
  • You need a file system mapping file if the file paths include identical directory names but have different drives. For example, if the job ticket specifies file:\\\D:\myfiles\testfiles\test1.pdf and the actual file path is file:\\\C:\myfiles\testfiles\test1.pdf, you must create a file system mapping file to convert the file path from the D drive to the C drive. The mapping looks like this:
    D:\;C:\
 
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